Battleground Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive, Stephen Chambers

Battleground Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive, Stephen Chambers

Battleground Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive, Stephen Chambers

Battleground Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive, Stephen Chambers

The landing at Suvla Bay in August 1915 was one of the great missed opportunities of the First World War. A British corps landed on an almost undefended part of the coastline north of the main Gallipoli battlefield, but then sat around its beachhead while the Turks rushed troops north. The chance to make an easy advance soon disappeared and the battle ended in yet another costly stalemate.

This book is rather different to books in the Battleground series that I've read. Most of them focus on the guidebook element, with most of the text consisting of a series of walks or tours. Here most of the book is devoted to a detailed history of the battle itself, supported by a large number of eyewitness accounts, contemporary photographs and useful maps.

The tours come in the final chapter, which makes up 40 of the 240 pages. This is perhaps an inevitable consequence of the British failure at Suvla, which limited the size of the battlefield and means that three single day walks pretty much cover the entire area. These look to be interesting, easy to follow trails, and nicely supplement the main text.

Chapters
1 - Prior Planning and Preparation
2 - The Landing - 6/7 August
3 - Day of Rest - Sunday 8 August
4 - Scimitar Hill - 9/10 August
5 - Battle of Kucuk Anafarta Ova - 12 August
6 - Day of Crisis: The Pimple and Kidney 15/16 August
7 - Stellenbosched - The Brass Hats Go
8 - The Last Great Show - 21/22 August
9 - Aftermath
10 - Battlefield Tours
Suvla Order of Battle - August 1915

Author: Stephen Chambers
Edition: Paperback
Pages: 192
Publisher: Pen & Sword Military
Year: 2011



1. Suvla: August Offensive - Gallipoli (Paperback)

Book Description Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English. Brand new Book. The landing at Suvla Bay, part of the August Offensive, commenced on the night of 6 August 1915. It was intended to support a breakout from Anzac Beach. Despite early hopes from a largely unopposed landing, Suvla was a mismanaged affair that quickly became a stalemate. The newly formed IX Corps, commanded by Lieutenant General Sir Frederick Stopford, failed, not for lack of sacrifice of its New Army and Territorial's, but for failure of generalship. Opportunities were thoughtlessly wasted due to lethargy. Suvla not only signalled the end of Stopford and many of his Brigadiers, but also saw the end of the Commander in Chief, Sir Ian Hamilton. It was the beginning of the end of the Gallipoli gamble and in its own right created a catalyst of disaster that would come to represent the failed campaign.This book adds to the Gallipoli story by recounting the Suvla Bay landing through a mix of official accounts intertwined with a rich collection of the participants' letters, diaries, personal accounts, photographs and maps. Seller Inventory # AAZ9781848845435


Book Description Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English. Brand new Book. The landing at Suvla Bay, part of the August Offensive, commenced on the night of 6 August 1915. It was intended to support a breakout from Anzac Beach. Despite early hopes from a largely unopposed landing, Suvla was a mismanaged affair that quickly became a stalemate. The newly formed IX Corps, commanded by Lieutenant General Sir Frederick Stopford, failed, not for lack of sacrifice of its New Army and Territorial's, but for failure of generalship. Opportunities were thoughtlessly wasted due to lethargy. Suvla not only signalled the end of Stopford and many of his Brigadiers, but also saw the end of the Commander in Chief, Sir Ian Hamilton. It was the beginning of the end of the Gallipoli gamble and in its own right created a catalyst of disaster that would come to represent the failed campaign.This book adds to the Gallipoli story by recounting the Suvla Bay landing through a mix of official accounts intertwined with a rich collection of the participants' letters, diaries, personal accounts, photographs and maps. Seller Inventory # AAZ9781848845435


Top reviews from Germany

Top reviews from other countries

I was rushed into hospital with a detached retina and bed bound with my head on one side for four days before surgery was possible. To relieve the boredom I read Stephen Chambers’ book Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive over two days and a night, managing to hold it close to the pillow reading with one eye.

What wonderful reading it was – had it been serialized I would have had to contain my excitement until the next episode. A wonderful book, extremely interesting, well researched and written – well worth reading again in the future. The surgeons saved my sight but Stephen Chambers saved my sanity.


The landing at Suvla Bay, part of the August Offensive, commenced on the night of 6 August 1915. It was intended to support a breakout from Anzac Beach. Despite early hopes from a largely unopposed landing, Suvla was a mismanaged affair that quickly became a stalemate. The newly formed IX Corps, commanded by Lieutenant General Sir Frederick Stopford, failed, not for lack of sacrifice of its New Army and Territorial's, but for failure of generalship. Opportunities were thoughtlessly wasted due to lethargy.

Suvla not only signalled the end of Stopford and many of his Brigadiers, but also saw the end of the Commander in Chief, Sir Ian Hamilton. It was the beginning of the end of the Gallipoli gamble and in its own right created a catalyst of disaster that would come to represent the failed campaign. This book adds to the Gallipoli story by recounting the Suvla Bay landing through a mix of official accounts intertwined with a rich collection of the participants' letters, diaries, personal accounts, photographs and maps.


Battleground Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive, Stephen Chambers - History

Steve is one of the leading military historians on the Gallipoli campaign. Even though this is his prime passion, he also has in-depth knowledge of many British military campaigns and battles that include Waterloo to the end of the Second World War. Stephen is a freelance battlefield guide, author and researcher specialising in British military history, from the redcoats to khaki.

He has written several books his first book in the Battleground Europe series, Gallipoli – Gully Ravine (Pen & Sword 2002) had high acclaim, along with its follow-on volumes Anzac The Landing (Pen & Sword 2008), Suvla: August Offensive (Pen & Sword 2011) and Anzac: Sari Bair (Pen & Sword 2014). British and commonwealth military history has continued to have been a successful theme, with Uniforms & Equipment of the British Army in World War One (Schiffer Books, 2005), the first serious work on the subject. Recently Stephen co-authored Gallipoli: The Dardanelles Disaster in Soldiers’ Words and Photographs (Bloomsbury 2015) with Richard van Emden and is working on Walking Gallipoli, to be published in 2018. Stephen’s Battleground Europe guidebooks have all been translated in to Turkish.

When not writing, Stephen is on the Battlefield, continuing his research and guiding groups. The best way to study a campaign is to walk in the footsteps of those involved, whether in the grasslands of Zululand, the mud of Flanders or the beaches of Gallipoli.

Stephen is a Trustee of the Gallipoli Association and a member of the Western Front Association and Orders and Medals Research Society. He is also a director of Great War Digital Ltd (http://www.greatwardigital.com/), home of the WW1 mapping Linesman GPS product.

Battles

Fall of Berlin Normandy Campaign Boer War Vimy Ridge Rorke's Drift WWI Gallipoli WWII Anglo/Zulu War Battle of the Somme 20 C. Arnhem Loos D-Day Mons Dieppe Dunkirk Eindhoven & Nijmegen Passchendaele Ypres Normandy Landings Vimy Operation Berlin Operation OVERLORD

Countries

South Africa Holland Belgium Western Europe Turkey France Germany Netherlands United Kingdom

Caters For

Adult Coach Groups College Groups Families Military & Veteran School Groups Small Groups

Areas of Expertise

Researching British and Empire serviceman of WW1/WW2.Uniforms & Equipment of the British and Commonwealth soldier in the 19 th /20 th Century. War photography.

British, Australian, New Zealand and Canadian military involvement in 20th century conflict


Battleground Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive, Stephen Chambers - History

The landing at Suvla Bay, part of the August Offensive, commenced on the night of 6 August 1915. It was intended to support a breakout from Anzac Beach. Despite early hopes from a largely unopposed landing, Suvla was a mismanaged affair that quickly became a stalemate.

The newly formed IX Corps, commanded by Lieutenant General Sir Frederick Stopford, failed, not for lack of sacrifice by its New Army and Territorials, but because of a failure of generalship. Opportunities were thoughtlessly wasted due to lethargy. Suvla not only signaled the end of Stopford and many of his Brigadiers, but also saw the end of the Commander in Chief, Sir Ian Hamilton. It was the beginning of the end of the Gallipoli gamble and in its own right created a catalyst of disaster that would come to represent the failed campaign.

This book adds to the Gallipoli story by recounting the Suvla Bay landing through a mix of official accounts intertwined with a rich collection of the participants&rsquo letters, diaries, personal accounts, photographs and maps.


Top reviews from India

Top reviews from other countries

I was rushed into hospital with a detached retina and bed bound with my head on one side for four days before surgery was possible. To relieve the boredom I read Stephen Chambers’ book Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive over two days and a night, managing to hold it close to the pillow reading with one eye.

What wonderful reading it was – had it been serialized I would have had to contain my excitement until the next episode. A wonderful book, extremely interesting, well researched and written – well worth reading again in the future. The surgeons saved my sight but Stephen Chambers saved my sanity.


BATTLEGROUND GALLIPOLI: ANZAC SARI BAIR

The tragic story related in this book, one of a series on Gallipoli, tells how the ambitious August 1915 offensive of Gen. Sir Ian Hamilton, designed to seize the Peninsular’s commanding heights, failed despite the heroic efforts of the fighting men, because of the battle plan’s tortuous complexity, and ferocious Turkish resistance orchestrated by Mustapha Kemal. It was the Allied last gasp at Gallipoli.

Description

The August Offensive at Gallipoli was born out of the failures of the original landings and the subsequent battles of late spring and early summer 1915.
General Sir Ian Hamilton, Commander-in-Chief of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, chose to play all his remaining cards in this daring and ingenious gamble that he hoped would finally turn the tide in the allies’ favour and bring his army up onto the heights overlooking the elusive Dardanelles. However the plan’s ingenuity became its eventual undoing. It required complex manoeuvring in tortuous terrain whilst many of the attacking soldiers were already weakened by the hardships of four months of enduring hellish conditions on the Peninsula.
What played out was heartbreakingly tragic command failed the bravery and sacrifice of the fighting soldier. This Anzac offensive, fought by a combined force of British, Australian, New Zealand and Indian troops, made infamous places such as Lone Pine, The Nek, Sari Bair, Chunuk Bair, Hill Q, The Farm, Hill 971 and Hill 60. Although tantalisingly close to success, the offensive fell short of its objectives and the attack ground down to a stalemate – not least the consequence of the inspiring leadership of Mustapha Kemal. : later Kemal Ataturk, father of modern Turkey. Hamilton’s gamble had failed. This is the story, told using a rich mix of letters, diaries, photographs and maps, of Gallipoli’s last battles the forlorn hope for a decisive victory.


Steve Chambers

During the Dardanelles campaign the Turks took very few prisoners. With stories of beatings, abuses, torture and executions, no one wanted to fall into the hands of the enemy. But, what was the truth?

Stephen Chambers is Trustee and historian of the Gallipoli Association. Whilst Gallipoli is his prime passion, he also has in-depth knowledge of many British military campaigns and battles that include the Zulu War to the end of the WW2.

Stephen is an accredited battlefield guide, author and researcher. His first book in the Pen & Sword Battleground Europe series, Gallipoli - Gully Ravine had high acclaim, along with its follow-on volumes Anzac The Landing, Suvla: August Offensive and Anzac: Sari Bair.

He also wrote Uniforms & Equipment of the British Army in World War One (Schiffer Books, 2005), the first serious work on the subject, and with co-author Richard van Emden wrote Gallipoli: The Dardanelles Disaster in Soldiers' Words and Photographs (Bloomsbury, 2015).

His latest work, Walking Gallipoli, was published in 2019.

When not writing Stephen is either doing his day-job, working in Cyber security, or on the Battlefield continuing his research and guiding groups. The best way to study a campaign is to walk in the footsteps of those involved, whether in the grasslands of Zululand, the mud of Flanders or the beaches of Normandy. Stephen is a member of the Western Front Association, Orders and Medals Research Society and a member of the Guild of Battlefield Guides.

Book your tickets here.

In the large lecture theatre (near to Weston Auditorium). The talk will start at 7.30pm with doors open from 7pm.


Watch the video: Battle of Sari Bair 1915 World War I Gallipoli Campaign